July 5, 2017

Items in italics are direct quotes from the articles below

http://www.businessinsider.com/signs-youll-never-be-rich-2016-4/

Contrary to popular belief, “Everyone has the same opportunity to acquire wealth,” says self-made millionaire Steve Siebold. But is wealth in the cards for you? To help you evaluate that, we’ve rounded up nine red flags to watch out for. While no one can predict the future, the following choices most likely won’t accelerate your path to riches. The 9 signs you’ll never be rich are: you put too much emphasis on saving – and not enough on earning, you haven’t started investing, you’re content with a steady paycheck, you buy things you can’t afford, you’re pursuing someone else’s dreams – not your own, you rarely step outside of your comfort zone, you don’t have goals for your money, you spend first and save what’s left over, and you believe getting rich is out of your reach. It’s important to save money to invest, however at some point you must take action and begin to focus on earning. “The masses are so focused on clipping coupons and living frugally they miss major opportunities,” Siebold writes. It’s important to not focus on losing money, but to focus on making it work hard for you. Some experts say that “it’s not about how much money you make, it’s about how much you keep,” but this shouldn’t be an excuse to disregard earning completely. To keep money, you have to earn it in the first place. A common thread among millionaires is that they develop multiple streams of income and have smart savings habits. It’s important to start investing today. It’s true the earlier you invest, the more the power of compound interest can help you, but also keep in mind that taking action is one of the most important steps. Your average person is content with being paid for their time vs. a rich person will wait to be paid based on results. Another important factor is if you’re living above your means then the unnecessary luxury items could be hindering your ability to build wealth. “When you pursue someone else’s dreams or goals, you may eventually become unhappy with your chosen profession,” he writes in “Change Your Habits, Change Your Life.” “Your performance and compensation will reflect it. You will eke out a living, struggling financially. You simply won’t have the passion that is necessary for success to happen.” You must be willing to step out of your comfort zone, and by doing this step, you’ll in time grow into a new level of personal success. Everything worthwhile in life is uphill. Rich people want to attain wealth and set attainable measurable goals. Put it down on paper and go after it. If you want to get rich, pay yourself first. “What most people do when they earn a dollar is pay everyone else first,” self-made millionaire David Bach writes in “The Automatic Millionaire.” “They pay the landlord, the credit card company, the telephone company, the government, and on and on.” Rather than spending and then saving whatever is leftover, save first. Set aside at least 10% of your gross income and make the process automatic, Bach emphasizes. That way, you’ll never even see the money and you’ll learn to live without it. Finally, what you personally think is critical. Your thoughts are words, and your words are powerful because they do become flesh. You live in an abundant world and you’re blessed with unique gifts, and perspective. Use your life to create massive value for those around you. Blessed are the problem solvers, so go find some problems to solve.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/charles-barkley-just-say-no-to-friends-and-family-who-ask-for-money-2017-07-01

NBA great Charles Barkley has some sound advice for rookies: Don’t give your money away to family and friends. “The first thing you do is learn how to save your money ’cause your family and friends are the worst people to spend your money. It has been that way for a long time. Barkley estimates that 60% or 70% of professional athletes go broke, “and 90% of the time it is because of family and friends.” “You have to learn to say the magic word: no,” Barkley recommends. “I do not owe you anything. If I want to do something for family, I’ll do it — but I do not have to keep them on payroll and support them their entire life. I lost a lot of family and friends because of that, and it was money well spent getting rid of them.” It’s not easy to say no, however there are moments when you want to take inventory of the situation and then weigh the consequences of saying yes. If you don’t stand for something, then you’ll fall for everything. Personally, I measure my yes and no against my value system which is the Bible. I also will consult with my wife and closest friends on issues that could involve a no. If it’s a financial decision then I talk with my wife even if I know the answer will be yes out of mutual respect and trust. Sometimes you can’t trust your own judgement so seek wise counsel.

If you are interested in creating a budget, then contact me for a financial checkup in the contact me section. Also, learn more about the self-lending principle in the mustard seed section.

This week, I’ve included STOP WISHING , START DOING – Powerful Motivation from the Success Archive YouTube channel.

“If you think you know it all, you’re a fool for sure; real survivors learn wisdom from others.”

Proverbs 28:26 MSG


March 15, 2017

http://www.investopedia.com/news/rich-get-richer-savers-lose-1-trillion/

America’s Gilded Age in the late nineteenth century was famous for industrialists who amassed unimaginable wealth — such as John D. Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie, and Cornelius Vanderbilt – and also for the era’s startling poverty. The U.S. is seeing something like that today. The booming stock market, up three-fold since the financial crisis, is no source of excitement for risk-averse small investors and savers, particularly retirees who expected to live off interest income. From 2008 through 2015, U.S. savers lost nearly $1 trillion of income from the cratering of yields on bank deposits and bonds, according to research by insurance company Swiss Re cited by the Wall Street Journal. And that’s even after adjusting for the benefit from paying lower rates on personal debt. Back in 2007 one-year CD yields were close to 4%, and currently one-year CD yields are less than 1%. Many retirees who were dependent upon these higher rates are being forced to find spare to part time work just to make ends meet. Some are moving into the stock market in the hopes of higher yields, and some can’t pay their bills. Time is a valuable tool, and to take advantage of compounding interest, a person must start early and often. A person should constantly be investing in his financial education and at the same time continue to create value for the sake of generating income and or security. I do recommend teaching yourself the self-lending principle as a means of breaking free from the cycle of consumer debt. When you buy assets, buy assets that are passive income producing that can be turned into a system and scaled. Without being creative, I argue a person could become a victim of the wealth gap that today’s current retirees are experiencing. That wealth gap is highlighted by the disparity between the pay of CEOs and their workers, which grew even wider in 2016, according to a study by consulting firm Compensation Advisory Partners, as cited in a Bloomberg story. The study looked at 42 U.S. public companies, a relatively small sampling, but it nonetheless is sure to spark debate. It found a 5.5% median pay hike for their CEOs, roughly double the 2.8% rise for the year in hourly pay for non-farm private sector workers, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. There is an income gap between workers and CEOs, so it’s important to work your job but also mind your business. What is your business? Your life. Every penny that comes into your bank account is your responsibility. Make your money work for you without you having to always work for it.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/robert-kiyosaki-says-entrepreneurs-should-read-this-book—-it-will-talk-to-your-soul-2017-02-28

Robert Kiyosaki has an unusual reading recommendation for would-be entrepreneurs — one that even the most devoted fans of the “Rich Dad, Poor Dad” author might not see coming. It tells the story of a knight about to meet his death in battle. It’s written by a Hollywood movie star. For Kiyosaki, it’s become a treasured read. “Believe it or not I read a lot of spiritual books. One of the best is ‘Rules for a Knight’ by Ethan Hawke,” Kiyosaki said during a January interview, when asked if there were any books he would recommend for MarketWatch readers. “It’s so well written, talks to your soul,” he said of the book. “All my friends are entrepreneurs and they all get copies of it.” This books takes the form of a letter from a knight written to his children right before battle, and it outlines the rules for being a knight. That may not sound like fertile material for learning the secret to success in the 21st century business world, but the knight’s rules do have an aura of entrepreneurial mantra about them. The rule for humility begins, “Never announce that you are a knight, simply behave as one,” while the rule for gratitude states, “For all that has been, a knight says, ‘Thank you.’ For all that is to come, a knight says, ‘Yes!’ ” Robert Kiyosaki states that he only operates at the highest of spiritual values and seeks to do business with people with similar values. Values such as integrity, and honor are words with significant meaning. Personally, I look for a person with strong spiritual values such as transparency, integrity, and consistency. Another book he recommends is “The Untethered Soul,” by Michael A. Singe. If you prefer your reading to be more firmly rooted in the worlds of business and finance, Kiyosaki suggested two books on economics in MarketWatch’s live interview with him in August, which you can read more about here. Robert Kiyosaki’s “Rich Dad Poor Dad” is coming upon its 20th anniversary, and it is a good introduction into looking at money differently. This book was personally recommended by my good friend. His mentoring and this book helped shape in part how I look at finances. If you read that book, then you must read his second book “Cashflow Quadrant”. If you don’t enjoy reading, then I suggest the audio book version or even the short summary clips you can find on YouTube. However, reading is essential to being able to see into how a writer thinks and it’s not the same as a quick edited version. I’ve found that when I’m struggling to read a book, I read something I enjoy reading and then pick up and read from the book I’m struggling with. Block out a time even if you have to set an alarm for it to make the time to read. Your brain is a muscle and it needs a work out from time to time.

Items in italics are direct quotes from the articles above

If you need are interested in creating a budget, then contact me for a financial checkup in the contact me section. Also, learn more about the self-lending principle in the mustard seed section.

For this week, I’ve included The Wisdom – Bruce Lee from the Absolute Motivation YouTube channel.

“If you think you know it all, you’re a fool for sure; real survivors learn wisdom from others.” – Proverbs 28:26 MSG‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬