June 21, 2017

Items in italics are direct quotes from the articles below

https://www.inc.com/logan-chierotti/self-made-billionaire-john-paul-dejoria-shares-2-facets-to-becoming-a-successful.html

Once as a young man, John Paul DeJoria was homeless. Today, this self-made entrepreneur is worth over $3 billion. The founder of Paul Mitchell Systems and Patron Tequila, DeJoria recently gave a speech at the TEDx conference in Los Angeles. A first-generation American turned entrepreneur, DeJoria is an excellent example of achieving the American dream. His personal story and the companies he created are nothing less than inspirational. He is a socially minded business owner who develops brands around the pillars of sustainability, social responsibility, and animal-friendliness. He is also a member of The Giving Pledge, a philanthropic gathering of the wealthiest families in the world who are all committed to donating the majority of their wealth toward pro-social causes. But for DeJoria, that dream didn’t come without a lot of hard work and a resilient spirit. In his TEDx speech, DeJoria discusses how he overcame obstacles in his life and shares a few secrets to gaining an edge on the competition. DeJoria believes in this important attribute: going the extra mile. It’s about working hard. In his speech, DeJoria sums up his point, saying, “Doing what you should be doing, even when no one is watching.” DeJoria has two facets to becoming a successful entrepreneur:

1. Be Prepared For A LOT Of Rejection – Rejection is an inevitable part of the entrepreneur’s journey, especially when starting out. In the beginning, DeJoria suggests that we must not listen to people who doubt our abilities and just keep pushing. More importantly, by being properly prepared to deal with rejection, you will be much less affected by it.

2. Produce A Service Or Product Of The Highest Quality – While some companies worry about generating income over all else, DeJoria believes the quality of a product is critical. “You want your product or service to be so good,” says DeJoria, “that you’re not in the selling business, you’re in the re-order business.”

These lessons are straightforward, and yet they are widely applicable. If you implement them into your life, maybe someday you will reach the level of success Mr. DeJoria has. However, if you do, try to live with his motto in mind.

“Success unshared is failure.” – John Paul DeJoria

http://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/110613/market-value-versus-book-value.asp

Understanding the difference between book value and market value is a simple yet fundamentally critical component of any attempt to analyze a company for investment. After all, when you invest in a share of stock or an entire business, you want to know you are paying a sensible price. Book value means the value of the business according to its financial statements. In this case, book value is calculated from the balance sheet, and it is the difference between a company’s total assets and total liabilities. Note that this is also the term for shareholders’ equity. For example, if Company XYZ has total assets of $100 million and total liabilities of $80 million, the book value of the company is $20 million. In a very broad sense, this means that if the company sold off its assets and paid down its liabilities, the equity value or net worth of the business, would be $20 million. Market value is the value of a company according to the stock market. Book value is the value of the company based on its books also known as the accounting value. Market value has a more meaningful implication in the sense that it is the price you have to pay to own a part of the business regardless of what book value is stated. Due to the importance of this article’s content, I’ve included a lot of the content. It’s worth reading.

There are three basic generalizations about the relationships between book value and market value:

  1. Book Value Greater Than Market Value: The financial market values the company for less than its stated value or net worth. When this is the case, it’s usually because the market has lost confidence in the ability of the company’s assets to generate future profits and cash flows. In other words, the market doesn’t believe that the company is worth the value on its books. Value investors often like to seek out companies in this category in hopes that the market perception turns out to be incorrect. After all, the market is giving you the opportunity to buy a business for less than its stated net worth.
  2. Market Value Greater Than Book Value: The market assigns a higher value to the company due to the earnings power of the company’s assets. Nearly all consistently profitable companies will have market values greater than book values.
  3. Book Value Equals Market Value: The market sees no compelling reason to believe the company’s assets are better or worse than what is stated on the balance sheet.

It’s important to note that on any given day, a company’s market value will fluctuate in relation to book value. The metric that tells this is known as the price-to-book ratio, or the P/B ratio:

P/B Ratio = Share Price/Book Value Per Share

(where Book Value Per Share equals shareholders’ equity divided by number of shares outstanding)

The author goes on to compare the metric of book value vs market value by analyzing Coca-Cola and Wells Fargo & Co. It’s important to determine whether book value or market value is your metric in making a financial decision regarding a company. My opinion is book value and market value are dependent upon the level of commitment to your investment strategy. If your strategy is to invest in paper assets then book value and market value can play a factor in your decision, but if you are going to buy a company that is publicly traded then there are other factors that you must consider. In other words, the greater the commitment, the more work you should put in to ensure that your investment produces income. Remember an investment should be an income producing asset. If it’s passive income, and that income is greater than your expenses then you are wealthy.

If you are interested in creating a budget, then contact me for a financial checkup in the contact me section. Also, learn more about the self-lending principle in the mustard seed section.

For this week, I’ve included WHO WILL YOU BECOME? – 30 Minute Epic Workout Motivation Friday from Basquiat Picasso YouTube channel.

“If you think you know it all, you’re a fool for sure; real survivors learn wisdom from others.”

Proverbs 28:26 MSG

June 7, 2017

Items in italics are direct quotes from the articles below

http://www.cnbc.com/2017/05/05/owner-of-americas-top-small-business-says-what-it-takes-to-succeed.html

The last week has been pretty incredible for the Maui Brewing Company. The U.S. Small Business Administration named co-founders Garrett Marrero and Melanie Oxley the National Small Business Persons of the Year. Online media brand Thillist named Maui Brewing Company the best craft brewery in the state. Two of its brews were recognized in the Los Angeles International Beer Competition and four of its brews got medals at the San Diego International Beer Festival. The recent accolades feel great, according to co-founder Garrett Marrero, 38. But what people don’t understand, he says, is how much work went into achieving that success. “I have had the comment, ‘Oh, it must be nice,’ sometimes. And I hear that, from someone and I am like, ‘You know what, yeah, it is nice. We have a nice home, it’s great to run a company like we do and to work with the people we do but the sacrifice that we put in? It meant no vacation, it meant being broke,” says Marrero. “If it was easy, everybody would be doing it. And it’s much easier to be on the other side of the fence pointing back at a successful business saying, ‘Oh yeah, that would have been so nice, I wish I would have done something like that.'” Morrero was working in San Francisco in finance when he decided to move to Hawaii in 2004 with his at the time girlfriend and now wife and business partner. In 2005, he started the company as a small brew-pub in 2005. A few years later, the company expanded into retail sales. By 2013, the Maui Brewing Company hit $10 million in sales. In 2016, it did between $12 and $16 million in revenue (Marrero declined to be more specific) and this year, it expects to do $20 million in sales. Currently, it has almost 400 employees. By the end of 2018 or early 2019, it plans to have opened additional restaurants and be employing 700 people. Maui Brewing Company’s success was buoyed by the rise in popularity of craft beer in the time since it opened, says Marrero. In 2005, there were 991 brew-pubs, 354 microbreweries, and 49 regional breweries, according to the Brewers Association, an industry organization. In 2016, there were 1,916 brew-pubs, 3,132 microbreweries and 49 regional breweries. The company isn’t successful just because of the owner’s commitment, its success is because of the commitment from every single employee. When the company sold off its old production space to two couples wanting to launch a start-up craft brewery, Marrero said “”I was very clear, I said, ‘This is going to be the hardest work you have ever done,'” he says.” ‘You are going to cry, you are going to bleed, you are certainly going to sweat here. Just be prepared, this is not going to be easy. You look at what we have today, that’s not the way it was five, six, seven, 10 years ago. If you are not ready to give it 110 percent every day, day in, day out, then running a business isn’t for you.'” In addition to putting commitment into your business, you also to have goals, and believe you will accomplish them. “If you don’t set out with the vision of being successful, you are going to fail,” says Marrero. “We were not willing to quit. The vision had to be focused like a laser in order to really get to where we are.”. Where there is no vision you will perish. Your vision and mission will drive you. If you wrap your vision and mission around the lens of eternity and legacy you will have a foundation that will give you the energy to keep moving forward even if it’s slowly.

http://www.investopedia.com/investing/marijuana-stocks/

Some people may envision the legalization of marijuana as an opportunity for someone like Philip Morris to start selling marijuana cigarettes. It’s much closer to the truth to say that marijuana is showing potential for medical uses, and companies that are developing medical applications for the plant stand to gain in the marketplace. The rush to get in on the marijuana craze has created hundreds of startups. The odds are that many of these will fail. The winners so far are established companies that are adding marijuana to their focus. Even the winners have seen drops in price lately. We have selected four marijuana stocks that have the potential to make significant gains. These stocks were chosen based on their array of marijuana-related products. These products are either in use or awaiting FDA approval. All figures are current as of June 12, 2017. The four stocks to watch are: ABBV, SMG, CRBP, and INSY. AbbVie Inc is a pharmaceutical company that currently has a cannabis based drug on the market. The FDA approved Marinol, which helps alleviate nausea or vomiting for chemotherapy patients. The drug also helps AIDS patients who have lost their desire to eat. This product is not the main product for the company. ABBV has reported increasing revenues in the past four years. In addition, its operating income has been increasing steadily. The company is benefiting from a host of useful drugs, including Marinol. This is a way to play the marijuana trend without incurring 100% exposure to the plant. Scotts Miracle-Gro Company which is known for its lawn and garden-care lines, the company is developing products for cannabis growers and also several pesticides for use on marijuana plants. The author recommends watching this stock rather than buying. Corbus Pharmaceuticals is a stock that has been volatile over the past few years. Resunab, which is designed to treat sclerosis, has had promising trials. The stock has tended to dip just before trial results are announced, then rally when the results are positive. Now Corbus is testing Resunab as a treatment for cystic fibrosis. The pessimism/optimism pattern will continue to play out as this drug is tested yet again. The company has negative operating income, and revenues are close to zero. Corbus is a company depending on the success of a single drug that could make or break it. In my opinion, this stock is a high-risk stock, and if you invest in this stock have a short-term strategy to invest for the capital gains. Insys Therapeutics, Inc. is in the process of developing a synthetic cannabis drug to treat childhood epilepsy. This company markets many non-canabis drugs. The company is also developing a spray technology to deliver the pharmaceutical based canaboids. Biotech stocks will normally exhibit volatility. It is best not to invest based on enthusiasm over marijuana, and keep a level head about actual results from drug trials. The pesticides angle is interesting, but such a product would have limited sales until marijuana is legalized nationwide. Know your asset class and focus your asset acquiring strategy to build your investment portfolio.

If you are interested in creating a budget, then contact me for a financial checkup in the contact me section. Also, learn more about the self-lending principle in the mustard seed section.

For this week, I’ve included PROVE YOU CAN DO IT – Motivational video from MulliganBrothers YouTube channel.

“If you think you know it all, you’re a fool for sure; real survivors learn wisdom from others.”

Proverbs 28:26 MSG

April 12, 2017

Items in italics are direct quotes from the articles below

http://www.investopedia.com/university/peratio/

Investors often want to compare how the share price of one company compares to that of another. But just looking at the stock price is like comparing apples to oranges since companies have different numbers of shares outstanding, and even if they had the same share float, companies operate in different industry segments or are at different stages in the corporate life cycle. Fortunately, financial analysts have developed a number of tools for such purposes of comparison. The price-to-earnings ratio, or P/E, the most widely used metric. Although it is quite a simple indicator to calculate, the P/E can be difficult to interpret. It can be extremely informative in some situations, while at other times it is difficult to parse. As a result, investors often misuse this ratio and place more evaluative power in the P/E than is sometimes warranted. This ratio measures the company’s stock vs its earnings, which can be measured against other companies. As a basic rule of thumb, a high P/E means the stock price is high compared to earnings which means the company is overvalued and the opposite is true. The link above is an introduction into an in-depth look at the P/E ratio and if you’re interested in learning about how to calculate it and how to and how not to use it in stock price analysis then please follow the link at the bottom of the article. For the sake of brevity, I included just the introduction.

http://www.investopedia.com/university/become-your-own-financial-advisor/

“If you don’t know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else.” – Yogi Berra If you build a house without a plan, what sort of results would you expect? Theoretically, you could get lucky and end up with the house of your dreams. What’s more likely, however, is that the house wouldn’t be anything like what you had wanted. You might need to move the doors and windows, build new walls and take down others – or worse. Investing isn’t any different. Without a plan, you could (again, theoretically) get lucky, but the odds are against it. Without goals – and a well-thought-out plan for meeting those goals – you probably won’t end up where you want to be financially, in either the short- or long-term. You have to make goals to meet goals. Historically investors have tried to beat the market or tried to get the highest rate of return possible. A new approach is goal based investing. This type of investing involves achieving certain life events such as saving for your retirement or buying your first house. The theory is that:

  • Setting goals makes it more likely that you’ll save for – and achieve – every goal.
  • You’ll be more motivated to reach a goal since you can gauge its progress.
  • You can consider the time horizon and risk level separately for each goal, and invest accordingly

Most people work with financial advisors to help achieve their financial goals, but the author advocates that you can be your own financial advisor if you are willing to put in the time and work. Due to the content of this article, I suggest you read the article in its entirety, and I’ve included some more content from the article:

Next, arrange your goals by the time horizon for achieving them:

Short-Term Goals Mid-Term Goals Long-Term Goals
Pay for a wedding Buy a vacation home Build a nest egg for retirement
Take a vacation Have the funds to start a new business Income stream for retirement
Save a down payment for a home Leave a financial legacy to your family
Save for your children’s education

Rather than just doing all this in your head – write it down. Putting your goals on paper makes them more “real” and you’ll be more likely to think about them. Plus, you can share your goals with your spouse, family or friends – which can give you a little motivational push.

The next step is to attach a dollar figure to each goal. With some goals, it’s easy to say how much you’ll need: for example, you plan on giving your daughter $5,000 (and no more!) to help pay for her wedding, or you want to save $10,000 for a trip to Antarctica. With other goals, it’s a bit trickier to nail down a specific amount, so you’ll have to spend some time crunching the numbers. There are lots of online calculators that can help – just search for the type of calculator you need, such as “retirement calculator” or “college savings calculator” to get started.

Once you have a list of goals and financial objectives for each, it’s easier to plan, budget and choose the right investments. In the next chapter, we’ll look at different retirement and tax-advantaged accounts you can use to meet your goals.

Like anything in life, if you want to become an expert at something, you need to practice your skill and learn from others better than you. Personally, I wouldn’t call myself a financial expert. I’m someone that cares about the financial health of myself and others and I share what I know in the hopes for a better future generation. What is your why?

If you need are interested in creating a budget, then contact me for a financial checkup in the contact me section. Also, learn more about the self-lending principle in the mustard seed section.

For this week, I’ve included FIRE WITHIN – Motivational Speech On Success from Motivation Archive YouTube channel.

“If you think you know it all, you’re a fool for sure; real survivors learn wisdom from others.” Proverbs
28:26 MSG‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬

April 5, 2017

Items in italics are direct quotes from the articles below

http://www.investopedia.com/investing/when-interest-rates-rise-best-investment-strategies/

In December 2016, the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) raised interest rates for the first time in a year, and then raised them again in March 2017. Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen indicated that the Fed could raise interest rates even further later this year. But what do rate hikes mean for advisors, their clients and investment portfolios? When interest rates increase, bond prices decrease. And while many analysts expect equities to suffer when interest rates go up – which is what many had predicted for markets in 2016 – these more recent rate hikes have not taken the wind out of the U.S. stock market’s sails. Lately, it seems that when rates rise, the value of equities doesn’t take a hit. But there’s no telling how long this trend will last. (For more, see: Fed Increases Interest Rates at March Meeting.) It’s important to keep in mind that when the market suddenly increases or decreases due to the influence of political, civil, or economic forces, then a market correction will happen soon. Due to the high probability of this event occurring, the author encourages the investor to have a financial advisor to consult with to make sure that his or her investment strategy and portfolio is ready to handle this change. Although advisors can’t predict what is going to happen in the stock market and how it will react to future interest rate hikes, they can take measures to ensure their clients benefit from rising interest rates while taking all potential risks into account. In a simplified example, let’s say a client is a balanced investor which usually means a portfolio is a 60/40 mix of equities and fixed-income investments (such as bonds). In a declining interest rate environment, the asset allocation may be 60% fixed income and 40% equity to take advantage of rising bond prices. In a, rising interest rate environment, the allocation can flip to 60% equities and 40% fixed income to benefit from bullish equities. The client’s risk tolerance always remains intact and slight adjustments are made to take advantage of stock market movements. (For more, see: The 4 Most Important Effects of Rising Interest Rates.) A well-diversified portfolio can hold both domestic as well as foreign investments, but how do rising interest rates affect foreign exchange? If $1 USD equals $1.35 Canadian dollars, the U.S. dollar is stronger. This means it’s not a good time to exchange Canadian money into U.S. currency because Canadians will only receive $0.65 USD for every Canadian dollar exchanged. However, it would be a good time for Americans who want to invest in Canadian currency to take advantage of the foreign exchange while the dollar is strong. When investing in any foreign currency, it’s important to remember to buy low and sell high. This basic strategy doesn’t consider a continuous cash flow, so you must balance this strategy against your cash flow principles. Even the author doesn’t recommend trying to time the market to make a quick return, because what you’re doing is basically gambling.

https://www.gobankingrates.com/personal-finance/10-ways-make-first-billion-dollars/

For many, a six-figure salary is the endgame, the true sign that you’ve made it in life. But, among those who top lists like the Forbes 100, a six- or even seven-figure salary is pocket change, just another step toward true riches. If you’re raring to dial up your earnings and be among the world’s richest, you’ll need to emulate the habits and accomplishments of the wealthy. Here’s how you can get started. The seven steps are: start and commit to your business, make smart investments, invent a solution, pursue your passion, take action, collaborate, and adopt a billionaire mentality. On the Forbes list, most of the billionaires are business owners that scaled their business to make a global imprint. It’s important to take risks, but with a full commitment to your business model and philosophy. You must have a vision that will help as many people as possible for as many generations as possible. It’s important to make smart investments not only in assets but also in the greatest asset you have, yourself. Sometimes, the best inventions are not original but instead innovations or improvements on existing products. A prime example of innovation comes from billionaire businessman Sam Walton, who opened the first Walmart in 1962. What made Walmart an innovation was the idea that the business could expand enough to sell products to consumers at lower prices than other retailers, saving them money on basic necessities. This basic premise transformed the way America shopped, while making Walmart one of the biggest retailers in the world — and Walton one of the richest men. It’s important to pursue your passion, but it’s even more important to put that passion into action. I’ve talked to some aspiring business owners and they can’t seem to gain any traction in their business because they don’t have the necessary commitment to act on their passion. It’s important to collaborate, because essentially no man is an island. You’ll need a team to build a business, so why not have a co-founder? A co-founder who both compliments and challenges your points of view but ultimately has your vision at heart. Rich people have a rich mentality, according to Steve Siebold, author of “How Rich People Think.” He has interviewed over 1,200 of the world’s wealthiest people to uncover the secrets to becoming rich. “While the masses believe becoming wealthy is out of their control, rich people know that making money is really an inside job. It’s a cause and effect relationship,” he wrote on Business Insider. “Anyone can become wealthy. It has nothing to do with your education or where you come from. It’s not what you do that guarantees wealth, it’s what you are.” So, focus on making things and crafting solutions. Create new products, improve current products and help people. But most importantly, be resilient and keep pushing forward

If you need are interested in creating a budget, then contact me for a financial checkup in the contact me section. Also, learn more about the self-lending principle in the mustard seed section.

For this week, I’ve included Advice From The Most Successful People On The Planet – Episode 7 from Absolute Motivation YouTube channel.

“If you think you know it all, you’re a fool for sure; real survivors learn wisdom from others.” Proverbs
28:26 MSG‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬

March 1, 2017

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/these-timeless-investing-principles-made-warren-buffett-rich-2016-06-02

 Warren Buffett distills investment success into three words — “margin of safety” — and tells investors to take one of two approaches: either focus on value or buy an index fund. Buffett, the “Oracle of Omaha,” has been steadfastly giving such advice for decades, through calm and choppy markets alike. In fact, 20 years ago I hosted Buffett and Charlie Munger, his Berkshire Hathaway BRK.A, +0.05% BRK.B, +0.04%  partner, for two days of debate that was recorded in my book, “The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America.”  At the time, Buffett’s investing style was out of fashion. Critics said the Oracle had lost his touch, misunderstanding the go-go “new economy” and its “game-changing” technology. But Buffett foresaw exceedingly high stock prices — which soon proved correct. Moreover, two decades later his value-based investing style has not only survived, but thrived, due in large part to three pivotal components:  margin of safety, focus on exceptionally valuable companies, those already run successfully, rather than turn around prospects, and know your limits and avoid investment targets outside what Buffet dubs your “circle of competence.” A margin of safety involves buying a stock at a low price compared to the value obtained. But don’t go to extremes; it’s better to buy a great business at a fair price than a fair business at a great price, Munger has famously quipped. You want to focus on companies that already run successfully. Buffet calls this focused investing. This concentration on stocks that have the highest probability of beating the market over the long term. Non-exit businesses are those commanding competitive advantages that deter rivals and withstand technological onslaughts for years, such as barriers to entry or brand strength. Buffett calls these features “moats,” like medieval defenses fortifying castles. Such quality businesses are desirable when run by people you like, trust and admire — individuals you’d be happy to have your child marry, Buffett advises. Finally, know your limits and avoid investment targets outside what Buffett dubs your “circle of competence.” So if you cannot make required judgments — about value, moats, and managers — then invest through low-fee index funds. Doing so beats the after-cost results most professionals deliver. As they say in poker, “If you’ve been in the game 30 minutes and don’t know who the patsy is, you’re the patsy.”  Buffett implores you: Don’t be the patsy. Investing in any of the asset classes requires certain core principles to follow. Find a mentor who has been in the asset class you love with at least 20+ years of experience and learn from him. His real-world knowledge will teach you far more than reading it. You don’t have to experience an event to gain wisdom. Listen and learn.

http://www.inc.com/betsy-mikel/ending-your-emails-with-this-1-word-vastly-improves-the-response-rate.html

I’m sure I’m only one of many people who feel as if they’re drowning in a sea of email. There are countless tips on how to manage your inbox if you’re on the receiving end and how to write better emails if you’re on the sending end. Yet still, sometimes emails simply go unanswered. I’ll admit I’m guilty of the nonresponse, especially when my emails start piling up after a few days away. This isn’t very hopeful if your day-to-day involves a lot of emailing — especially if it’s critical that you get a response. Thankfully, the folks at Boomerang, a plug-in for scheduling emails, did a little study to see if the language people use to close their emails has any effect on the response rate. “We looked at closings in over 350,000 email threads,” data scientist Brendan Greenley wrote on the Boomerang blog. “And found that certain email closings deliver higher response rates.” The author lists of closings on e-mails and asked which were the most effective in getting replies. “Emails that closed with a variation of thank you got significantly more responses than emails ending with other popular closings,” Greenley writes. Here are the exact numbers: Emails that ended in Thanks in advance had a 65.7 percent response rate. Of emails that ended in Thanks, 63 percent got responses. The third most effective closing was Thank you with a 57.9 percent response rate. Across the board, Boomerang found that sign-offs that included some sort of expression of gratitude had a 36 percent relative increase in average response rate. Also, keep in mind that ending your e-mail with regards or best is one of the worst ways to end your e-mails. How you present yourself is important. First impressions are captured in a person’s mind, and depending upon the impression, the person may not express any further interest. The best approach is an attitude of gratitude in all situations. It doesn’t mean you don’t get angry, or sad when its justified, however if you consistently give an image of unprofessionalism then don’t be surprised if you don’t receive the results you want in work and or life. Everything worthwhile is uphill and how you present your view of the journey can impact the people around you.
Items in italics are direct quotes from the articles above

If you need are interested in creating a budget, then contact me for a financial checkup in the contact me section. Also, learn more about Mustard Seed in the mustard seed section.

For this week, I’ve included THE WINNING MENTALITY – Powerful Motivation 2017 from the Be Inspired YouTube channel.

“If you think you know it all, you’re a fool for sure; real survivors learn wisdom from others.” Proverbs 28:26 MSG

January 25, 2017

http://www.investopedia.com/articles/retirement/08/retire-millionaire-million-dollars.asp

Having a million-dollar portfolio is a retirement dream for many people. Making that dream come true requires some serious effort. While success is never a sure thing, the 10 steps outlined below will go a long way toward helping you achieve your objective. The steps are: set the goal, start saving, get aggressive, prepare for rainy days, save more, watch your spending, monitor your portfolio, max out your options, catch-up contributions, and have patience. Briefly I’ll highlight some points that author made. Savings can be started by taking advantage of your company’s 401k plan, or even something as simple as an Acorns account. Be sure to save if you want to build your way to being a millionaire. If you are constantly spending as much as you make, then you won’t have anything to set aside for when you stop working. It’s also important to have a strategy when it comes to asset-allocation. As time passes you want to set aside more to save. Take advantage of tax deferred savings plans to set aside income that won’t be taxed. An important thing to remember is to monitor and re-balance your portfolio. Finally, the power of compounding takes time so be patient and consistent. If you’re interested in having your own account that will build your wealth for you, then click on the following link:

https://acorns.com/invite/PE7WB6

Retirement might seem far away, but when it arrives nobody ever complains about having too much money. Some people even question whether a million dollars is enough. That said, with lots of planning and discipline, you can reach your retirement goals and live a comfortable life after work.

http://www.investopedia.com/advisor-network/articles/011317/rough-guide-your-future-retirement-needs/

Friends and family often ask me how much savings they need in order to retire. While I am more than happy to talk in generalities, I try to steer away from giving any specifics when I don’t have all the facts. Without a complete view of their financial picture, it would not only be impossible but also irresponsible of me to answer their questions. Unfortunately, more often than not, before I have a chance to respond, they hastily begin shouting out numbers. “Do I need half a million? One million?” Typically this leads to me awkwardly trying to explain that the solution isn’t that simple and ethically I really shouldn’t answer their question. This response is usually met with a bewildered look and the inevitable “So you’re saying that’s not enough?” (Heavy sigh) At this point, I coyly suggest that if they really want to know the answer they should become a client. (For related reading, see: 10 Habits of the Healthy, Wealthy & Wise.) In an effort to provide friends and family with some guidance (and to quell the family banter), I have devised a quick back of the envelope calculation to give a ballpark estimate of how much savings one needs to retire. The calculation is rather easy to complete but does require some preliminary information before you can get started. I have included a list of the necessary data as well as a simple worksheet that will walk you through this approach. Please bear in mind that this is a rudimentary calculation that won’t give you an exact figure, but it can be used as a reality check to see if you are on target to retire comfortably.

Here’s the information that the author recommends that you’ll need:

A pay statement, federal and state tax returns, social security statement, pension statement, and estimate of any other income you may receive in retirement. The author presents a scenario for analysis. In this scenario, the author examines ten line descriptions: net pay, number of pay periods, basic annual income needs, taxes, medical expenses, total annual income needed, retirement income (social security, pension, etc.), annual income needed from savings, multiplier, and savings required. Understand that this scenario is a static model, and doesn’t consider the fluctuations of life. Also, keep in mind that this model doesn’t replace income producing assets. If your passive income is greater than your expenses, then you are wealthy.

If you need are interested in creating a budget, then contact me for a financial checkup in the contact me section.

For this week, I’ve included Money Doesn’t Buy Happiness, But It Is… – Motivational Video from the Endless Motivation YouTube channel.

“If you think you know it all, you’re a fool for sure; real survivors learn wisdom from others.” Proverbs
28:26 MSG‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬


January 18, 2017

http://www.investopedia.com/financial-edge/0113/the-dangers-of-a-reverse-mortgage.aspx

It’s difficult to turn on the television these days without seeing a slew of commercials for reverse mortgages. They feature past-their-prime celebrities such as Henry Winkler and Fred Thompson, extolling the benefits of “guaranteed tax-free income” for those 62-years-old and over. What they don’t tell you is that reverse mortgages can be dangerous and can put your biggest asset—your home—at risk. A reverse mortgage is simply a regular mortgage where the proceeds are paid out over a series of installment payments instead of all at once. This plan will use the existing equity of your home, and doesn’t need to be repaid until you sell the home or die. This type of loan can be beneficial under a scenario of a senior citizen using the proceeds to stay in his home while using the proceeds for medical expenses vs. selling his home. There are six dangers to keep in mind: complexity, pressure, future health, eligibility for government programs, high fees, and spousal eviction. The article goes into detail on these dangers. Reverse mortgages can be an important source of emergency funds for some seniors who would otherwise have to sell their homes to access their equity. There are several dangers to these plans. However, that can put your home at risk and sap your asset base. In all honesty, this article is presented to bring awareness that this type of product exists, and I personally am not advocating it. I do encourage the reader to pay attention to the fact that the writer of the article used the term asset base. Remember to grow your income-producing asset column to prevent forced into this type of a scenario.

http://www.investopedia.com/news/george-soros-lost-nearly-1b-due-trump-win-gld-nflx

According to a report in the Wall Street Journal, billionaire investor and philanthropist George Soros lost approximately a billion dollars following President-elect Donald Trump’s victory last November. Soros, who donated generously to the Clinton campaign, had bet that a Trump victory would lead to a sustained depression in market performance. However, the markets have responded with enthusiasm to Trump’s election in hopes that he would cut taxes and red tape. Soros also has investments in major technology companies, such as Amazon.com Inc. (AMZN) and Netflix Inc. (NFLX), whose stock prices fell following the President-elect’s shock victory. (For more, see also: How Did George Soros Get Rich?)

In contrast, Stanley Druckenmiller, a one-time Soros protegé, seems to have moved ahead of his old boss. The Wall Street Journal report states that Duquesne Family Office LLC, Druckenmiller’s firm, saw “gains of 10% in 2016.” This is because Druckenmiller, who has voted for Republican candidates in the past, predicted that the markets would swoon initially but rally later on a Trump victory.

Druckenmiller’s bearish stance on bonds and his bullish take on the dollar vs euro did help his profits. Gold prices, which were expected to rise after a Trump win, dropped sharply after the elections. Liberty Broadband Corporation (LBRDA), which was one of Soros’s big buys has rallied 12.5% since election night at the time this article was written.

If you need are interested in creating a budget, then contact me for a financial checkup in the contact me section.

For this week, I’ve included Learning From Your Mistakes – Motivational Video from the Endless Motivation YouTube channel.

“If you think you know it all, you’re a fool for sure; real survivors learn wisdom from others.” Proverbs
28:26 MSG‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬