May 17, 2017

Items in italics are direct quotes from the articles below

http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-buy-bitcoin-using-coinbase-2017-5

A year and a half ago, the idea of buying the virtual currency bitcoin was laughable. After a rapid rise in value in 2013, the cryptocurrency’s value more than halved by mid-2015. At its lowest point, one bitcoin was equal to about $230. But now Bitcoin is at an all-time high, and rising. Within the last month, the price of one bitcoin has climbed from $1,280 to around $1,480. Given the currency’s covert nature, the average person still may not understand how buying and selling actually works. Using the app Coinbase, which lets anyone trade bitcoins for a small fee, we decided to find out. A brief warning: If you’re going to do this, tell your bank you’re about to buy bitcoin. More on that later. This article provides a step by step process of buying Bitcoin, so I recommend reading the article if you’re interested in purchasing it. The author also has his reservations about using Coinbase, however I personally am going to use this site to buy Ethereum. It is another cryptocurrency. If you’re interested in forming an investment group with me, then contact me.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/7-money-making-lessons-from-the-richest-man-who-ever-lived-2017-05-02

Jacob Fugger was a German banker who financed kings, explorers, bishops and popes — and along the way made the biggest fortune ever amassed by a business person. The grandson of a peasant, he persuaded Leo X to legalize for-profit lending. One of his money-making schemes provoked Martin Luther to write the 95 Theses and kick off the Reformation. He played kingmaker in the 1519 election for Holy Roman Emperor. Jacob (Jakob in German) Fugger and his money gave the vote to Charles V of Spain and put Charles atop an empire as big as Napoleon’s. Fugger was worth about $400 billion in current dollars at the time of his death in 1525 — or 2% of Europe’s GDP at the time. (John D. Rockefeller was close in dollar terms, but his wealth equaled a smaller part of the U.S. economy.) Here are some of his secrets: invest when others fear, be indispensable, know the facts, know the numbers, get a good education, keep cool, and give something back. It’s best to not let fear or analysis-paralysis stop you from making a move when it comes to investing into your future. Do you have a vision? Do you have a mission? Do you have it written out? Be indispensable not just in your work place, but in your life. If you have integrity then people will trust in you and be willing to help you. Do what you say and say what you do, but make sure you think before you speak. Knowing the facts and the numbers will help you stay grounded. Getting a good education will help you draw out the person you are destined to be. Study what you love even if it’s for free, but think about how can you turn it into an income generating asset. How can it generate passive income or any form of income? Keep cool and use your will to stay focused on your plan whatever it may be. However, in the end, look at everything through the lens of eternity and legacy. There’s no sense in amassing great wealth with no plan on how you can help humanity. Fugger is best known as the creator of the Fuggerei, the world’s first affordable housing project. He thought anyone who worked deserved to have a roof over their head. Rent came to one quarter the market rate. The Fuggerei remains in operation and is the largest tourist attraction in his home city of Augsburg. Greg Steinmetz is the author of “The Richest Man Who Ever Lived: The Life and Times of Jacob Fugger.” I encourage you to read a book on a topic that interests, and a topic that is challenging to read to keep feeding one of your greatest assets: your mind.

If you need are interested in creating a budget, then contact me for a financial checkup in the contact me section. Also, learn more about the self-lending principle in the mustard seed section.

For this week, I’ve included MOTIVATIONAL VIDEO – LIVE LIKE A KING from MulliganBrothers YouTube channel.

“If you think you know it all, you’re a fool for sure; real survivors learn wisdom from others.”

Proverbs 28:26 MSG

April 19, 2017

Items in italics are direct quotes from the articles below

http://www.businessinsider.com/laura-vanderkam-power-hour-productivity-2016-10

Laura Vanderkam the author of this video argues that we should consciously spend time on the parts of our job that initially drew us to our job in the beginning. To do more of the things you love, you must recognize that certain aspects of work will expand to fill all available space. She uses e-mail as an example. We should carve out time to go after the higher priority item, and the best way to do this is a power hour. So, for the first hour of the day instead of doing e-mail, work on the first top priority item of the day. Try to carve out Monday morning for whatever is most important to you. And particularly for sort of speculative important but not urgent work that you’re going to have a hard time carving out time for. If you do it Monday morning it’s kind of the equivalent of paying yourself first.
This type of process is best for a high priority project but not a urgent project.. Time is our most valuable and precious assets, so it’s important to use effectively and wisely. I’ve found myself getting up early so I can carve out time to manage my spiritual life, and my business life. Arriving earlier to work allows me time to work on larger weekly tasks without having to be stressed. By doing this simple habit, I build margin into my time, and honor the principle of rest and I don’t go into time debt.

http://www.businessinsider.com/best-books-for-first-time-investors-according-to-a-financial-adviser-2017-4

If you are uncertain, optimistic or nervous about investments right now, it may be a good time to do a little reading. Knowledge is really the best way to counterbalance emotions, which we know may be running high for some right now. Our advice: Check out what the masters have said. They’ve devoted their lives to understanding investing and captured it all in print. It turns out there is truly nothing new under the sun; their insights apply year-in and year-out. We love original sources, so here’s our top seven books for you to read or re-read. If you don’t enjoy reading, then I challenge you to build this important habit. The books express the author’s ideas more fully than video or audio. Try reading a page out of your favorite book a day, even if it’s a children’s book. If you still don’t enjoy reading, then try an audio version, video summary, or even consult with a respected friend. The top seven books are: Security Analysis by Benjamin Graham and David L. Dodd, Margin of Safety by Seth Klarman, Against the Gods: A History of Risk by Peter Bernstein, Antifragile by Nassim Taleb, The Upside of Stress by Kelly McGonigal, Wealth in Families by Charlie Collier, Classics: An Investor’s Anthology by Charles D. Ellis. Each book will introduce you into the world of risk, and proper thinking of an investor. It’s important to remember that you can’t just do the process, and expect the results, it’s even better to understand the process. Use your own gifts and talents that were given to you since you were born to creatively execute your investment strategy. Also have a budget. You should know what your bottom line number is monthly before you add on the stress of investing. Be willing to lose it all, and have in place an investment strategy for savings and for wealth. If you don’t have a budget in place then please contact me to let me show you my system.

If you need are interested in creating a budget, then contact me for a financial checkup in the contact me section. Also, learn more about the self-lending principle in the mustard seed section.

For this week, I’ve included the Darkness – Motivational Video from MulliganBrothers YouTube channel.

“If you think you know it all, you’re a fool for sure; real survivors learn wisdom from others.” Proverbs
28:26 MSG‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬

April 12, 2017

Items in italics are direct quotes from the articles below

http://www.investopedia.com/university/peratio/

Investors often want to compare how the share price of one company compares to that of another. But just looking at the stock price is like comparing apples to oranges since companies have different numbers of shares outstanding, and even if they had the same share float, companies operate in different industry segments or are at different stages in the corporate life cycle. Fortunately, financial analysts have developed a number of tools for such purposes of comparison. The price-to-earnings ratio, or P/E, the most widely used metric. Although it is quite a simple indicator to calculate, the P/E can be difficult to interpret. It can be extremely informative in some situations, while at other times it is difficult to parse. As a result, investors often misuse this ratio and place more evaluative power in the P/E than is sometimes warranted. This ratio measures the company’s stock vs its earnings, which can be measured against other companies. As a basic rule of thumb, a high P/E means the stock price is high compared to earnings which means the company is overvalued and the opposite is true. The link above is an introduction into an in-depth look at the P/E ratio and if you’re interested in learning about how to calculate it and how to and how not to use it in stock price analysis then please follow the link at the bottom of the article. For the sake of brevity, I included just the introduction.

http://www.investopedia.com/university/become-your-own-financial-advisor/

“If you don’t know where you are going, you might wind up someplace else.” – Yogi Berra If you build a house without a plan, what sort of results would you expect? Theoretically, you could get lucky and end up with the house of your dreams. What’s more likely, however, is that the house wouldn’t be anything like what you had wanted. You might need to move the doors and windows, build new walls and take down others – or worse. Investing isn’t any different. Without a plan, you could (again, theoretically) get lucky, but the odds are against it. Without goals – and a well-thought-out plan for meeting those goals – you probably won’t end up where you want to be financially, in either the short- or long-term. You have to make goals to meet goals. Historically investors have tried to beat the market or tried to get the highest rate of return possible. A new approach is goal based investing. This type of investing involves achieving certain life events such as saving for your retirement or buying your first house. The theory is that:

  • Setting goals makes it more likely that you’ll save for – and achieve – every goal.
  • You’ll be more motivated to reach a goal since you can gauge its progress.
  • You can consider the time horizon and risk level separately for each goal, and invest accordingly

Most people work with financial advisors to help achieve their financial goals, but the author advocates that you can be your own financial advisor if you are willing to put in the time and work. Due to the content of this article, I suggest you read the article in its entirety, and I’ve included some more content from the article:

Next, arrange your goals by the time horizon for achieving them:

Short-Term Goals Mid-Term Goals Long-Term Goals
Pay for a wedding Buy a vacation home Build a nest egg for retirement
Take a vacation Have the funds to start a new business Income stream for retirement
Save a down payment for a home Leave a financial legacy to your family
Save for your children’s education

Rather than just doing all this in your head – write it down. Putting your goals on paper makes them more “real” and you’ll be more likely to think about them. Plus, you can share your goals with your spouse, family or friends – which can give you a little motivational push.

The next step is to attach a dollar figure to each goal. With some goals, it’s easy to say how much you’ll need: for example, you plan on giving your daughter $5,000 (and no more!) to help pay for her wedding, or you want to save $10,000 for a trip to Antarctica. With other goals, it’s a bit trickier to nail down a specific amount, so you’ll have to spend some time crunching the numbers. There are lots of online calculators that can help – just search for the type of calculator you need, such as “retirement calculator” or “college savings calculator” to get started.

Once you have a list of goals and financial objectives for each, it’s easier to plan, budget and choose the right investments. In the next chapter, we’ll look at different retirement and tax-advantaged accounts you can use to meet your goals.

Like anything in life, if you want to become an expert at something, you need to practice your skill and learn from others better than you. Personally, I wouldn’t call myself a financial expert. I’m someone that cares about the financial health of myself and others and I share what I know in the hopes for a better future generation. What is your why?

If you need are interested in creating a budget, then contact me for a financial checkup in the contact me section. Also, learn more about the self-lending principle in the mustard seed section.

For this week, I’ve included FIRE WITHIN – Motivational Speech On Success from Motivation Archive YouTube channel.

“If you think you know it all, you’re a fool for sure; real survivors learn wisdom from others.” Proverbs
28:26 MSG‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬

April 5, 2017

Items in italics are direct quotes from the articles below

http://www.investopedia.com/investing/when-interest-rates-rise-best-investment-strategies/

In December 2016, the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) raised interest rates for the first time in a year, and then raised them again in March 2017. Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen indicated that the Fed could raise interest rates even further later this year. But what do rate hikes mean for advisors, their clients and investment portfolios? When interest rates increase, bond prices decrease. And while many analysts expect equities to suffer when interest rates go up – which is what many had predicted for markets in 2016 – these more recent rate hikes have not taken the wind out of the U.S. stock market’s sails. Lately, it seems that when rates rise, the value of equities doesn’t take a hit. But there’s no telling how long this trend will last. (For more, see: Fed Increases Interest Rates at March Meeting.) It’s important to keep in mind that when the market suddenly increases or decreases due to the influence of political, civil, or economic forces, then a market correction will happen soon. Due to the high probability of this event occurring, the author encourages the investor to have a financial advisor to consult with to make sure that his or her investment strategy and portfolio is ready to handle this change. Although advisors can’t predict what is going to happen in the stock market and how it will react to future interest rate hikes, they can take measures to ensure their clients benefit from rising interest rates while taking all potential risks into account. In a simplified example, let’s say a client is a balanced investor which usually means a portfolio is a 60/40 mix of equities and fixed-income investments (such as bonds). In a declining interest rate environment, the asset allocation may be 60% fixed income and 40% equity to take advantage of rising bond prices. In a, rising interest rate environment, the allocation can flip to 60% equities and 40% fixed income to benefit from bullish equities. The client’s risk tolerance always remains intact and slight adjustments are made to take advantage of stock market movements. (For more, see: The 4 Most Important Effects of Rising Interest Rates.) A well-diversified portfolio can hold both domestic as well as foreign investments, but how do rising interest rates affect foreign exchange? If $1 USD equals $1.35 Canadian dollars, the U.S. dollar is stronger. This means it’s not a good time to exchange Canadian money into U.S. currency because Canadians will only receive $0.65 USD for every Canadian dollar exchanged. However, it would be a good time for Americans who want to invest in Canadian currency to take advantage of the foreign exchange while the dollar is strong. When investing in any foreign currency, it’s important to remember to buy low and sell high. This basic strategy doesn’t consider a continuous cash flow, so you must balance this strategy against your cash flow principles. Even the author doesn’t recommend trying to time the market to make a quick return, because what you’re doing is basically gambling.

https://www.gobankingrates.com/personal-finance/10-ways-make-first-billion-dollars/

For many, a six-figure salary is the endgame, the true sign that you’ve made it in life. But, among those who top lists like the Forbes 100, a six- or even seven-figure salary is pocket change, just another step toward true riches. If you’re raring to dial up your earnings and be among the world’s richest, you’ll need to emulate the habits and accomplishments of the wealthy. Here’s how you can get started. The seven steps are: start and commit to your business, make smart investments, invent a solution, pursue your passion, take action, collaborate, and adopt a billionaire mentality. On the Forbes list, most of the billionaires are business owners that scaled their business to make a global imprint. It’s important to take risks, but with a full commitment to your business model and philosophy. You must have a vision that will help as many people as possible for as many generations as possible. It’s important to make smart investments not only in assets but also in the greatest asset you have, yourself. Sometimes, the best inventions are not original but instead innovations or improvements on existing products. A prime example of innovation comes from billionaire businessman Sam Walton, who opened the first Walmart in 1962. What made Walmart an innovation was the idea that the business could expand enough to sell products to consumers at lower prices than other retailers, saving them money on basic necessities. This basic premise transformed the way America shopped, while making Walmart one of the biggest retailers in the world — and Walton one of the richest men. It’s important to pursue your passion, but it’s even more important to put that passion into action. I’ve talked to some aspiring business owners and they can’t seem to gain any traction in their business because they don’t have the necessary commitment to act on their passion. It’s important to collaborate, because essentially no man is an island. You’ll need a team to build a business, so why not have a co-founder? A co-founder who both compliments and challenges your points of view but ultimately has your vision at heart. Rich people have a rich mentality, according to Steve Siebold, author of “How Rich People Think.” He has interviewed over 1,200 of the world’s wealthiest people to uncover the secrets to becoming rich. “While the masses believe becoming wealthy is out of their control, rich people know that making money is really an inside job. It’s a cause and effect relationship,” he wrote on Business Insider. “Anyone can become wealthy. It has nothing to do with your education or where you come from. It’s not what you do that guarantees wealth, it’s what you are.” So, focus on making things and crafting solutions. Create new products, improve current products and help people. But most importantly, be resilient and keep pushing forward

If you need are interested in creating a budget, then contact me for a financial checkup in the contact me section. Also, learn more about the self-lending principle in the mustard seed section.

For this week, I’ve included Advice From The Most Successful People On The Planet – Episode 7 from Absolute Motivation YouTube channel.

“If you think you know it all, you’re a fool for sure; real survivors learn wisdom from others.” Proverbs
28:26 MSG‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬

March 29, 2017

http://www.inc.com/jeff-haden/the-awful-truth-about-getting-rich-that-no-one-wants-to-hear.html

Many people want to be incredibly wealthy. (How you define “incredibly wealthy” is of course up to you–my “incredibly wealthy” may seem like pocket change to Floyd Mayweather, Jr.) Many people don’t hope to achieve that goal…but many people do. And there’s certainly nothing wrong with that. But you will never become incredibly wealthy by working for someone else. And you will never become incredibly wealthy by living a “safe” (more on that in a moment), “positive work-life balance,” time-clock-punching professional life. If you want to have a certain amount of money in the bank, then you are less likely to have it if you’re working for someone else. Even people with advanced degrees will earn an average income of less than six figures. When you work for someone else, you implicitly accept a limited upside and unlimited downside. Unless you somehow manage to be the employee version of a unicorn, you will never, ever become incredibly wealthy. In 2014, it took $127 million in adjusted gross income to make the top 400. (That sounds like a lot, but it just barely got you in the door. The average income of everyone on the list was $317 million.) Those are fun stats to whip out at parties, but what matters is how the top 400 made their money:

  • Wages and salaries: 4.4 percent
  • Interest: 4.2 percent
  • Dividends: 10.9 percent
  • Sale of Capital Assets: 65.2 percent
  • Partnership and S Corp Net Income: 16.2 percent

The author points out the way to become incredibly wealthy is to start your own business that can be scaled to a significant size. Unless you’re an actor, or musician, or athlete–in which case you’re still an entrepreneur, because you’re in the business of you–starting a successful business is the only realistic way to become incredibly wealthy. If that is your goal, you’ll need to start yours. Today.

http://www.investopedia.com/articles/fundamental-analysis/09/value-investing.asp

Value investing, and any type of investing, varies in execution with each person. There are, however, some general principles that are shared by all value investors. These principles have been spelled out by famed investors like Peter Lynch, Kenneth Fisher, Warren Buffet, John Templeton and others. In this article, we will look at these principles in the form of a value investor ‘s handbook.
Value investors agree that you should buy businesses and not stocks. Investors should look at the fundamentals of the company and not the trends in the stock price. You wouldn’t pick a spouse based solely on his or her shoes, and you shouldn’t pick a stock based on cursory research. You have to love the business you are buying, and that means being passionate about knowing everything about that company. You need to strip the attractive covering from a company’s financials and get down to the naked truth. Many companies look far better when you judge them on basic price to earnings (P/E), price to book (P/B) and earnings per share (EPS) ratios than they do when you look into the quality of the numbers that make up those figures. It’s best to invest in companies that you understand vs. being attracted to a company’s earnings. To quote Buffett: “look for three qualities: integrity, intelligence, and energy. And if they don’t have the first, the other two will kill you.” You can get a sense of management’s honesty through reading several years’ worth of financials. How well did they deliver on past promises? If they failed, did they take responsibility, or gloss it over? A good manager will be focused on growing the company and not just its market value. Growth in the company increases the value to the shareholders. If you do happen to find undervalue stocks and if you have the liquidity available, then go ahead and buy as much as you can. Keep in mind that the market only matters when you enter or exit a position. When you sell an investment, you expose your portfolio to capital gains and usually have to sell a loser to balance it out. Both of these sales come with transaction costs that make the loss deeper and the gain smaller. By holding investments with unrealized gains for a long time, you forestall capital gains on your portfolio. The longer you avoid capital gains and transaction costs, the more you benefit from compounding. Value investing requires a lot of patience and discipline, but when you do so, the potential payoff is large. Ask yourself how does this fit into my personal investing strategy? Do I like investing in paper assets, real estate, businesses or commodities? What is my concentration level? What is my exit strategy? Most importantly what is my legacy? When you look at your life through the lens of legacy you won’t lose focus on your vision and goals.

Items in italics are direct quotes from the articles above

If you need are interested in creating a budget, then contact me for a financial checkup in the contact me section. Also, learn more about the self-lending principle in the mustard seed section.

For this week, I’ve included Be Powerful –motivational speech video – T.D. Jakes from the Motiversity YouTube channel.

“If you think you know it all, you’re a fool for sure; real survivors learn wisdom from others.” Proverbs
28:26 MSG‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬

March 8, 2017

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/this-is-no-1-financial-regret-of-older-americans-2016-05-17

Most Americans are filled with regrets — financial regrets. Fully three in four, in fact, admit they harbor financial regrets, according to a survey of more than 1,000 adults by Bankrate.com. Their biggest regret: not saving for retirement early enough (nearly one in five Americans put this in the No. 1 spot). What’s more, among those 65 and up, 27% said this was the biggest regret, compared with 17% of those aged 30 to 49. The author goes on to show the consequences of waiting to save comparing the difference of saving at age 25 vs 35. According to 2015 data from the Employee Benefit Research Institute, fully 28% of workers say they have less than $1,000 saved and 17% have between $1,000 and $9,999; meanwhile, just 14% of workers have $250,000 or more saved. That’s far too little, according to many financial advisers: Guidelines from Fidelity, for example, state that by the age of 30, you should have your entire salary saved; by 40, three times your salary saved; and, by 50, six times your salary saved. Other financial regrets include not having an emergency savings and too much student loan debt. It’s important to have a budget to know how much is coming out and when it’s coming out. Make sure you have positive cash flow at the end of the month. If you do, I recommend a simple 10-10-80 strategy and just as important starting to use the self-lending principle.

We’ve all heard the stories of young entrepreneurs who start a successful business from their parents’ basement. But how do you build a business from inside a van? Mariah Coz knows. She built a seven-figure business in a 35-square-foot van–that’s about the size of a small bathroom!–which she shared with her boyfriend as they traveled across the country. They spent about a year and a half on the road, visiting nearly every state in the continental United States. Among her favorite experiences were hiking in Yosemite, exploring Yellowstone, and seeing the Grand Canyon. Mariah took her expertise of living in her camper and turned into an online course, and began teaching business strategy through her company Femtrepreneur. She teaches others interested in freedom how to build online business and offers six important tips. The tips are: be flexible, pick one day a week and block out five to eight hours for work, figure out what chains have the best Wi-Fi and become a repeat customer, do less with more impact, set realistic expectations and goals, and focus on mobile-friendly marketing. You must be able to systematize your business so it will run with as little involvement from you as possible. The author suggests setting aside a block of time to complete all your tasks for the week which will allow focus and productivity. If you are going to use a business’s Wi-Fi I suggest that you have a good identity theft protection plan in place, because your information is on an open network and can become compromised. “When you have limited time to devote to your business, you have to focus on the high-impact activities and cut out all the rest. That means applying the 80-20 principle–focusing on the 20 percent of activities that bring in 80 percent of your revenue. Focus on just one product, one marketing channel–one thing at a time,” she says. Finally, it’s important to set realistic goals while at the same time making sure that your marketing is convenient for your needs if you are constantly traveling. Mariah believes everyone has unique life experiences and skills that can help people and can be monetized. And the good news is, it doesn’t need to take a lot of time or money to get started. As she puts it, “You can start now with what you have, where you are, no matter what situation you are in!” It’s important to act, and to not waste your days because they are measured. Ask yourself how can I take advantage of my unique gifts and knowledge, how can I reach the world and make it better, and how can I do it just once and have it accessible to the world? If you can figure out how to answer these three questions, then in my opinion you can build a business.
Items in italics are direct quotes from the articles above

If you need are interested in creating a budget, then contact me for a financial checkup in the contact me section. Also, learn more about the self-lending principle in the mustard seed section.

For this week, I’ve included Retrain your Mind from the Be Inspired YouTube channel.

“If you think you know it all, you’re a fool for sure; real survivors learn wisdom from others.” Proverbs 28:26 MSG

March 1, 2017

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/these-timeless-investing-principles-made-warren-buffett-rich-2016-06-02

 Warren Buffett distills investment success into three words — “margin of safety” — and tells investors to take one of two approaches: either focus on value or buy an index fund. Buffett, the “Oracle of Omaha,” has been steadfastly giving such advice for decades, through calm and choppy markets alike. In fact, 20 years ago I hosted Buffett and Charlie Munger, his Berkshire Hathaway BRK.A, +0.05% BRK.B, +0.04%  partner, for two days of debate that was recorded in my book, “The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America.”  At the time, Buffett’s investing style was out of fashion. Critics said the Oracle had lost his touch, misunderstanding the go-go “new economy” and its “game-changing” technology. But Buffett foresaw exceedingly high stock prices — which soon proved correct. Moreover, two decades later his value-based investing style has not only survived, but thrived, due in large part to three pivotal components:  margin of safety, focus on exceptionally valuable companies, those already run successfully, rather than turn around prospects, and know your limits and avoid investment targets outside what Buffet dubs your “circle of competence.” A margin of safety involves buying a stock at a low price compared to the value obtained. But don’t go to extremes; it’s better to buy a great business at a fair price than a fair business at a great price, Munger has famously quipped. You want to focus on companies that already run successfully. Buffet calls this focused investing. This concentration on stocks that have the highest probability of beating the market over the long term. Non-exit businesses are those commanding competitive advantages that deter rivals and withstand technological onslaughts for years, such as barriers to entry or brand strength. Buffett calls these features “moats,” like medieval defenses fortifying castles. Such quality businesses are desirable when run by people you like, trust and admire — individuals you’d be happy to have your child marry, Buffett advises. Finally, know your limits and avoid investment targets outside what Buffett dubs your “circle of competence.” So if you cannot make required judgments — about value, moats, and managers — then invest through low-fee index funds. Doing so beats the after-cost results most professionals deliver. As they say in poker, “If you’ve been in the game 30 minutes and don’t know who the patsy is, you’re the patsy.”  Buffett implores you: Don’t be the patsy. Investing in any of the asset classes requires certain core principles to follow. Find a mentor who has been in the asset class you love with at least 20+ years of experience and learn from him. His real-world knowledge will teach you far more than reading it. You don’t have to experience an event to gain wisdom. Listen and learn.

http://www.inc.com/betsy-mikel/ending-your-emails-with-this-1-word-vastly-improves-the-response-rate.html

I’m sure I’m only one of many people who feel as if they’re drowning in a sea of email. There are countless tips on how to manage your inbox if you’re on the receiving end and how to write better emails if you’re on the sending end. Yet still, sometimes emails simply go unanswered. I’ll admit I’m guilty of the nonresponse, especially when my emails start piling up after a few days away. This isn’t very hopeful if your day-to-day involves a lot of emailing — especially if it’s critical that you get a response. Thankfully, the folks at Boomerang, a plug-in for scheduling emails, did a little study to see if the language people use to close their emails has any effect on the response rate. “We looked at closings in over 350,000 email threads,” data scientist Brendan Greenley wrote on the Boomerang blog. “And found that certain email closings deliver higher response rates.” The author lists of closings on e-mails and asked which were the most effective in getting replies. “Emails that closed with a variation of thank you got significantly more responses than emails ending with other popular closings,” Greenley writes. Here are the exact numbers: Emails that ended in Thanks in advance had a 65.7 percent response rate. Of emails that ended in Thanks, 63 percent got responses. The third most effective closing was Thank you with a 57.9 percent response rate. Across the board, Boomerang found that sign-offs that included some sort of expression of gratitude had a 36 percent relative increase in average response rate. Also, keep in mind that ending your e-mail with regards or best is one of the worst ways to end your e-mails. How you present yourself is important. First impressions are captured in a person’s mind, and depending upon the impression, the person may not express any further interest. The best approach is an attitude of gratitude in all situations. It doesn’t mean you don’t get angry, or sad when its justified, however if you consistently give an image of unprofessionalism then don’t be surprised if you don’t receive the results you want in work and or life. Everything worthwhile is uphill and how you present your view of the journey can impact the people around you.
Items in italics are direct quotes from the articles above

If you need are interested in creating a budget, then contact me for a financial checkup in the contact me section. Also, learn more about Mustard Seed in the mustard seed section.

For this week, I’ve included THE WINNING MENTALITY – Powerful Motivation 2017 from the Be Inspired YouTube channel.

“If you think you know it all, you’re a fool for sure; real survivors learn wisdom from others.” Proverbs 28:26 MSG